Watch Out: The Deadliest Snakes Around The Globe

Published on 09/06/2020
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Slimy? Eww. Beady eyes? Double eww. Fangs filled with deathly venom? Yeah, I’m creeped out and running for the hills. Snakes have the uncanny ability to shame even the scariest horror films simply by their slithery presence. Albeit, it’s common knowledge that snakes also are incredibly dangerous which is why we rounded up a list of THE deadliest snakes around the globe. Check it out, if you dare.

Anaconda

Thanks to Hollywood flicks, we’re all quite familiar with the Anaconda. The snake, not the song! What the anaconda lacks in venom quantity, as it’s bordering on very, very low, it makes up for in size. Additionally, the Anaconda’s method of killing is to wrap victims around the midsection and compress until they are totally crushed. Only then does it swallow you whole. GULP.

Anaconda

Anaconda

Jararaca

Southeastern Brazil is where you’ll find the Jararaca, one of most known venomous snakes around. During 1902 and 1945, the Jararaca caused more than 52% (3,446 cases) of snakebites, with a staggering 0.7% mortality rate (25 deaths). No thanks, I’m reconsidering my cheap ticket to the area as we speak.

Jararaca

Jararaca

Black Mamba

If you don’t already have the heebie-jeebies, brace yourself. Black Mamba’s have the intense ability to strike 12 sequential times and each bite is filled with monstrous levels of neurotoxin. And if that wasn’t bad enough, a bite is nearly 100 percent deadly with death occurring in as little as 15 minutes. That says it all!

Black Mamba

Black Mamba

Tiger Keelback

A water snake (GULP) located in Japan and throughout Eastern Asia, the Tiger Keelback is up next. Man, looking at a cheap ticket to cure wanderlust is a challenge at this point. Note that the Tiger Keelback is rather shy, but incredibly dangerous. This freaky snake can consume toxic creatures, store said creature in their own glands, before they actually release it later.

Tiger Keelback

Tiger Keelback

Indian Cobra

A common and deadly family of snakes that can be found in India are commonly referred to as the ‘Big Four’ and yes, they’re all deadly and they’re all on this list. In Indian mythos, the Indian Cobra is respected and commonly used by ‘snake charmers’. When bitten, you’ll experience paralysis which can lead to respiratory failure or even a heart attack.

Indian Cobra

Indian Cobra

Rattlesnake

Surely the rattlesnake is a snake species you’ve heard of before and that’s namely due to the fact that they’re considered killing machines. Fun? NOPE. Located in parts of North America, the one good thing about getting bitten by a rattlesnake is the fact that their bites are scarcely fatal if treated immediately.

Rattlesnake

Rattlesnake

Common Krait

Meet another member of India’s ‘Big Four’, the Common Krait is easily recognizable what with it’s very flat head. During the day, if you encounter the snake, the likelihood that it’ll hide and react slow is greater. However at night, the Common Krait will not hesitate to bite at the first sign of annoyance and its agitation will rise quickly. Should you leave a bite untreated, nerve damage, muscle paralysis, and brain damage will soon follow.

Common Krait

Common Krait

Saw Scaled Viper

Saw Scaled Vipers’ call India, China, and Asia home so we’d be careful with that hotel reservation. While nocturnal, Saw Scaled Vipers’ are ridiculously quick. Immediate pain, swelling, and bleeding from the mouth is the first ordeal you’ll suffer through. Additionally, your blood pressure will plummet while your heart rare slows. Note that for the following four to five weeks of a bite, you’ll experience crippling agony.

Saw Scaled Viper

Saw Scaled Viper

Desert Horned Viper

Up next on the list is the Desert Horned Viper. True to its name, this fella sports horns above its eyes. Best to avoid that cheap ticket to the Middle East and northern parts of Africa, if we were you. Why? Their potent venom of course.

Desert Horned Viper

Desert Horned Viper

Philippine Cobra

Out of the entire Cobra species, you’re looking at THE most venomous and deadliest one. The Philippine Cobra has the terrifying ability to shoot its venom some 10 feet in distance…great. Within minutes, you’ll endure cardiac and respiratory system failure.

Philippine Cobra

Philippine Cobra

Boomslang

Customarily based in South Africa, the Boomslang is lightning fast, can climb trees, and has a bite brimming with venomous toxins. Oh yeah, they also have extraordinary Superman-like eyesight and can move their heads in an Exorcist-like motion to gather a better view of objects directly in front of them. Just nope to all of the above.

Boomslang

Boomslang

Peron’s Sea Snake

Might be best to avoid that cheap flight to the Gulf of Siam, the Strait of Taiwan, and the Coral sea islands. Why? Because that’s the home of the Peron’s Sea Snake whose bite is filled with enough venom to kill you in minutes. Plus it’s the only sea snake that has spines on its head.

Perons Sea Snake

Peron’s Sea Snake

Elephant Trunk Snake

Indonesia is home to this fat, scary snake so mark that location off your cheap flight plan. Similar to that of an elephant, the Elephant Trunk Snake has saggy, wrinkly skin which grows 10 feet in length. Bare in mind, its length and strength can pull a grown man underwater – we’re talking about the snake, not the elephant. Yeah, let that sink in. Pun not intended!

Elephant Trunk Snake

Elephant Trunk Snake

Eastern Brown Snake

The Eastern Brown Snake may have a tame name but there’s nothing tame about this snake; it carries enough venom to instantly kill an adult human being. Not good would be an understatement. Researchers have strongly advised that if you should encounter one, stay still. Easier said than done, right?

Eastern Brown Snake

Eastern Brown Snake

King Cobra

Throughout Asia and the Indian jungles dwells the home of the King Cobra – the longest, most venomous snake in the entire world. While the King Cobra tends to only hunt lizards, rodents, and other snakes, however when it does bite a human, the venom can be fatal. How fatal? If left untreated, the survival rate is a staggering 40 percent.

King Cobra

King Cobra

Death Adder

Australia, New Guinea, and some nearby islands are host to the most venomous and fastest snake around. Thing is, they have incredible patience as they are known to lie in wait to ambush prey. Within six hours of being bitten, you’ll experience minor discomfort which then leads to paralysis and respiratory failure. However luckily, there is an antivenin available.

Death Adder

Death Adder

Darevsky’s Vipers

Armenia and Turkey sadly host one of the most venomous snakes in the region, the Darevsky’s Vipers. However, a recent study suggests there are only around 500 of these particular snakes left alive. Whether that’s good news or not is up to you.

Darevskys Vipers

Darevsky’s Vipers

Yellow Bellied Sea Snake

Yes, the Yellow Bellied Sea Snake is easy to spot in the water so let’s chalk that up to good news. However if bitten, the venom is highly potent.

Yellow Bellied Sea Snake

Yellow Bellied Sea Snake

Coastal Taipan

Native to coastal regions of northern and eastern Australia and the island of New Guinea, you’ll find the Coastal Taipan. Most toxicological studies have revealed this species is the sixth-most venomous land snake. Yikes.

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Coastal Taipan

Russell’s Viper

The Russell’s Viper, or Daboia, can be found throughout Asia and is part of India’s ‘Big Four’. A large number of snakebites are credited to the Russell’s Viper mainly due to their more aggressive mien and presence in highly populated areas. Swell.

Russels Viper

Russel’s Viper

Malayan Snake

Malayan Snake, or the Blue Krait, is located throughout parts of Southeast Asia and Indonesia. Makes the thought of a cheap flight to the area seem less appealing. Moreover, half of the bite factor from a Malayan Snake is fatal, unless of course you receive the antivenin. Additionally, their venom is 16 times more toxic(!) than the Cobra, so there’s that.

Malayan Snake

Malayan Snake

Dubois’ Seasnake

Locations like Papua New Guinea, New Caledonia and the northern, eastern and western coastal areas of Australia are where you’ll find the Dubois’ Seasnake. Doesn’t leave much room for a cheap ticket or hotel reservations in the area, now does it? Moreover, the Dubois’ Seasnake is one of the most venomous sea snakes, and ranks as one of the top three most venomous snakes in the entire world. Great.

Dubois Sea Snake

Dubois Sea Snake

Many Banded Krait

Commonly referred to as the Taiwanese Krait or the Chinese Krait, the Many Banded Krait is an extremely venomous species located in central and southern China and in Southeast Asia. Yup, we’d leave that cheap ticket behind. Furthermore, the mortality rate if bitten ranges between 25 to 35% or 70 to 100%. Either way, not good!

Many Banded Krait

Many Banded Krait

Burrowing Asp

Cue the “whomp-whomp-whomp” as the terrifying Burrowing Asp ranks high as very dangerous, especially when around small children. Why? The Burrowing Asp hides underground, like in sand pits or underneath slides. Furthermore, their protruding fangs are so poisonous and all the fangs need to do is to get in contact with your skin. They don’t even need to bite you to cause serious harm or death.

Burrowing Asp

Burrowing Asp

Cape Cobra

Next up is one THE most dangerous species of cobra in all of Africa. Largely due to the fact the Cape Cobra carries exceptionally potent venom and can be found around or in houses. Furthermore, the mortality rate is intensely high as it takes an hour (in severe cases) to ten hours (or more) for death to occur. Respiratory failure, due to the onset of paralysis, is also a symptom but an antivenom exists.

Cape Cobra

Cape Cobra

Forest Cobra

Native to central and western parts of Africa is where you’ll find the Forest Cobra. While bites are less common to humans than any other African snake, a bite from the Forest Cobra is **ding-ding-ding** a life-threatening emergency.

Forest Cobra

Forest Cobra

Black Tiger Snakes

Booked a cheap flight and hotel reservation to the land down under? Keep a watchful eye out for Black Tiger Snakes then. Tingling, sweating, and numbness are all symptoms that follow a bite, and within half an hour of a bite, death can occur if left untreated. While Tiger Snakes are scared of humans, if they’re cornered, BOOM. They turn aggressive and strike.

Black Tiger Snakes

Black Tiger Snakes

Gaboon Viper

The rain forests and savannas of sub-Saharan Africa are where you’ll find the Gaboon Viper. Just like the viper species, the Gaboon Viper is venomous, however this particular species is the world’s heaviest viperid! Oh yeah, it also has the longest fangs of any viper. Think it ends there? Nope. The Gaboon Viper also has the highest venom yield of any snake in the world. Phew.

Gaboon Viper

Gaboon Viper

Green mambas

Out of the three kinds of Green Mambas (Western, Eastern, and Jameson) that exist, all are highly venomous, aggressive, and unpredictable. Great. Furthermore all three have the characteristics of being highly arboreal, alert, quick, and agile. Additionally, their venom is much more rapid-acting AND the dendrotoxins are was more devastating to the central nervous system. No thanks.

Green Mambas

Green Mambas

South American Bushmaster

The South American Bushmaster is the longest venomous snake that you can find in the Western Hemisphere, like South America and the forests east of the Andes. Large, quick, and turns aggressive when cornered is what this particular snake boasts of.

South American Bushmaster

South American Bushmaster

Sharp-Nosed Pit Viper

Sharp-Nosed Pit Viper may look weird but they’re also incredibly dangerous. Additionally, bites are also commonly fatal, which isn’t all that surprising. Symptoms from a bite include severe local pain and bleeding, but luckily there is an antivenom available.

Sharp Nosed Pit Viper

Sharp Nosed Pit Viper

Beaked Sea Snake

Whether you know it as the Hook-Nosed Sea Snake, Common Sea Snake, or the Valakadyn Sea Snake; the Beaked Sea Snake makes the list. Yes, it is also the most highly venomous sea snake species. Over 50% of all bites are caused by sea snakes, and also a vast majority of the envenoming and fatalities.

Beaked Sea Snake1

Beaked Sea Snake

Mojave Rattlesnake

The venom of the Mojave Rattlesnake is considered to be one of the most debilitating and potentially deadly out of all the North American snakes. However, the chances of survival from a bite are much higher if you immediately seek medical attention. Kind of a no brainier there.

Mojave Rattlesnake

Mojave Rattlesnake

Caspian Cobra

Also known as the Central Asian Cobra, Oxus Cobra or Russian Cobra, but no matter what you call it, the Caspian Cobra is known to be the most bad tempered and aggressive of the Cobra species. Found in Central Asia, we recommend you’re careful with your hotel reservation. Before we forget to mention, the Caspian Cobra is the most venomous cobra species worldwide. #greatnotgreat

Caspian Cobra

Caspian Cobra

Terciopelo

Commonly called the Bothrops Asper or Terciopelo, although it doesn’t matter what you call it, it’s still deadly. Like most pit vipers, the Terciopelo can be found in southern Mexico and northern South America. The “ultimate pit viper” is often found in lowland habitats, where human habitation is more likely. Smart and deadly, not what you want in a snake…ever.

Terciopelo

Terciopelo

Malayan Pit Viper

Headed to Southeast Asia with your cheap ticket in hand and a map to the hotel reservation, well we’ve got news for you. The ill-tempered and quick to strike Malayan Pit Viper lurks throughout the area so yah know, stay alert.

Malayan Pit Viper

Malayan Pit Viper

Tiger Rattlesnake

While the Tiger Rattlesnake carries a low venom yield, it’s still considered the most toxic of all rattlesnake venom. Oh goody. Tiger Rattlesnakes may be reluctant to bite, but they’re exceptionally aggressive. The total package, eh?

Tiger Rattlesnake

Tiger Rattlesnake

Common Death Adder

Native to Australia, the Common Death Adder carries a high toxic neurotoxin which leads to paralysis and sometimes death. Furthermore, this fella has one of the fastest strikes out of all other venomous snakes in Australia. When bitten, death can occur within six hours. Uhhhhh, no. Just no.

Common Death Adder, Acanthophis Antarcticus, Bruce Thomson.

Common Death Adder

Western Brown Snake

Scientifically known as Pseudonaja nuchalis, the Western Brown Snake is a venomous species which is common in Western Australia. As they have quite small fangs, bites often are painless. However when bitten, symptoms include headaches, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, severe coagulopathy, and even kidney damage.

Western Brown Snake

Western Brown Snake

Hairy Bush Viper (Atheris Hispida)

Best known and easily remembered for its keeled dorsal scales which give off a bristly appearance. You’ll often see them on top of flowers and terminal leaves so keep a watchful eye. And yes, bites can be fatal without treatment.

Hairy Bush Viper (Atheris Hispida)

Hairy Bush Viper (Atheris Hispida)

Dugite

Turns out that the Dugite is a venomous, potentially lethal, snake that is native to Western Australia. Its venom is one of the most lethal venom in the world – causing coagulopathic and procoagulant effects. While it doesn’t attack humans much, generally they are most active in October and November.

Dugite

Dugite

Spitting Cobras

When defending themselves, a spitting cobra will project venom from their fangs. In some instances, as far as 2 m (6.6 ft) away from its prey. Currently there are around 17 species of spitting cobras.

Spitting Cobras

Spitting Cobras

Inland Taipan

When it comes to the taipan genus, the Inland is an extremely venomous snake. In fact, many say that it THE most venomous snake in the world. Great. Just great. Unlike most snakes, the Inland is a specialist mammal hunter meaning that its venom is specially made to kill warm-blooded species. Just one bite could least kill at least 100 fully grown men and death will occur in 30 to 45 minutes if not treated. Now it tends to avoid human contact as it’s quite a shy snake but its venom is what lands it square on this list.

Inland Taipan

Inland Taipan

Black Necked Spitting Cobra

Must we have spitting cobras? Looks like it. Found in sub-Saharan Africa, this snake has a medically significant venom, however the mortality rate for untreated human bites is rather low. Its neurotoxic venom will irritate the skin and it may cause blindness if the venom comes into the eye, especially if the eye is not washed off.

Black Necked Spitting Cobra

Black Necked Spitting Cobra

Belchers Sea Snake (Hydrophis belcheri)

Goody, another extremely venomous snake species. (You did catch the sarcasm there, didn’t you?) However let’s just reaffirm that the MOST venomous sea snake is the Dubois’ seasnake. But in any regard, be cautious! Note that it tends to bite fisherman most commonly but that just “25% of those bitten are envenomed”.

Belchers Sea Snake

Belchers Sea Snake

Eyelash Palm Pit Viper

First of all, you’re not fooling anybody with a name like that – and technically it’s called the Bothriechis schlegelii. Its creepy, scary “eyelashes” don’t take away from the fact that this snake is a venomous pit viper species located in Central and South America.

Eyelash Palm Pit Viper

Eyelash Palm Pit Viper

Red Bellied Black Snake

Now, while its venom is indeed capable of inflicting drastic morbidity, a bite isn’t generally fatal and is also much less venomous than any other Australian elapid snake. As one of Australia’s best-known snakes, it can be found in the woodlands, forests, and swamplands of eastern Australia.

Red Bellied Black Snake

Red Bellied Black Snake

Water Moccasin (Agkistrodon piscivorus)

Other common names are swamp moccasin, black moccasin, cottonmouth, gaper, or viper. Most noteworthy here is that this particular snake is the ~only~ semiaquatic snake to exist. Meaning that it can live and hunt both on land and underwater. The Agkistrodon piscivorus is found in southeastern United States.

Water Moccasin

Water Moccasin

Chinese Cobra

Oh goody, the Chinese Cobra is actually one of the most prominent venomous snakes in all of mainland China and Taiwan. As if that wasn’t bad enough, it’s caused the most snakebites to humans as well. Now we can’t stress enough just how venomous this snake is, but we will say that an antivenom exists however the death rate when bitten is rising.

Chinese Cobra

Chinese Cobra

Green Anaconda

Otherwise known as the common anaconda and water boa, the Green Anaconda is actually a non-venomous boa in South America. So why does it make the list? Well it is THE heaviest and longest snake to exist. I don’t think we need to remind you that when pitted against this boa, it wins due to its sheer size and force.

Green Anaconda

Green Anaconda

Rinkhals

While not a true cobra, it is rather a species of the venomous elapid located in southern Africa. Oh, we should mention that it does an alternative creepy name – ring-necked spitting cobra. Little tip for you, when the Rinkhals attacks humans, it aims for the face. Especially the eyes, which we don’t need to tell you would be extremely painful.

Rinkhals

Rinkhals

Alcatrazes Lancehead

Luckily the Alcatrazes Lancehead, a venomous pitviper species, can only be found on the Alcatrazes Islands in southeastern Brazil. If that’s something you consider lucky. Currently it’s considered a “Critically Endangered” species.

Alcatrazes Lancehead

Alcatrazes Lancehead

Jamesons Mamba

Belonging to the family Elapidae, the Jamesons Mamba is a quick, highly arboreal, and very venomous snake. It’s location? Africa. If bitten and left untreated, death can occur within 30 to 120 minutes – yup, it’s that venomous.

Jamesons Mamba

Jamesons Mamba

Cascabel (Crotalus durissus)

You’re looking at South America’s most venomous pit viper species, the Crotalus durissus. It’s best recognized for the two distinct stripes that begin at the base of the head. Moreover its venom has neurotoxins (crotoxin and crotamine) which cause progressive paralysis cause that’s always nice.

Cascabel

Cascabel

Puff Adder

Book a cheap flight to savannah or the grasslands from Morocco and western Arabia all throughout Africa (apart from the Sahara and rain forest areas) if you want to encounter the Puff Adder. However seeing as how it’s literally responsible for the most snakebite fatalities in Africa, we suggest you don’t push your luck. Puff adders tend to hang in highly populated areas and they also have an immensely aggressive disposition – what you want in a snake, really.

Puff Adder

Puff Adder

The Common Brown Snake

One of the most venomous snake is the common brown snake. Although it is not as poisonous as the inland taipan, it makes up for it with its particular aggressiveness. The common brown snake is native to Australia and New Guinea and is considered to be particularly dangerous. She reacts extremely nervously when they meet and usually bites immediately. She is extremely fast and can take 4 to 5 bites in quick succession at once.

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The Common Brown Snake

Common Krait

The multi-banded krait, also called multi-banded krait or Chinese krait, is mainly found in Myanmar, Laos, northern Vietnam, Taiwan and southern China. Requiring bodies of water near its habitat, the many-banded krait prefers to live in bamboo thickets, lowland forests, paddy fields, or open, damp plains. The venom contained in a bite from this snake could kill up to a dozen men. A variety of symptoms can occur after a bite.

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Common Krait

Little Indian Viper

While not the most venomous snake in the world, the common viper is arguably the most dangerous. In terms of deaths from snakes per year, this snake ranks first. It is believed that around a quarter of the 40,000 deaths from snake bites can be attributed to this viper. In India alone, around 8,000 people fall victim to this poisonous snake every year. At 60 to 70 centimeters in length, the common viper is relatively small compared to the poisonous snakes mentioned above.

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Little Indian Viper

Oxyrhopus Emberti

And today it bears my name: Oxyrhopus emberti. It is one of the so-called false coral snakes, which imitate the coloring of the poisonous coral snake in order to keep predators at bay. The only recently discovered snake changes color as it grows (over a meter, no animal would fall for the deception anymore). We did not find them in the wild but preserved in a museum in Bolivia. She had previously been misidentified.

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Oxyrhopus Emberti

Hamadryad

The majestic king cobra goes by many names – its scientific name is Ophiophagus hannah, for example. It is the longest venomous snake in existence, a mythological symbol and the national animal of India. The king cobra is surprisingly very shy and tends to avoid people, but is easily irritated by sudden movements: The worldwide emergency department record shows that bites caused by the king cobra are rather uncommon. Rather, the king cobra is one of the endangered species and is protected in China, Vietnam and India. While the king cobra is one of the most well-known species, it is ultimately the least dangerous cobra on this list.

Screenshot 5

Hamadryad

Common Lance Viper

The common lance viper is a typical pit snake found primarily in the tropical lowlands of South America, as well as southeastern Colombia, parts of Venezuela and Trinidad. What makes the common lance viper a formidable foe is its coloration and pattern. The base color varies and can be olive green, brown, gray or yellow. The common lance viper is perfectly camouflaged by this coloring before it strikes. In addition, they are very fast and can move almost unnoticed due to their coloration. The bite of this snake is extremely deadly, but immediate medical attention can save the life of the bitten person.

Screenshot 6

Common Lance Viper

Chinese Cobra

The Chinese cobra is prone to being irritable and aggressive. She is aware of her surroundings at all times and at all times. If she feels threatened, she raises her collar. Younger animals in particular very often react nervously to disturbances and then attack without warning. Due to the spreading civilization in their habitat, there are more and more unpleasant encounters between humans and animals, which sometimes don’t end well. With this species, caution is advised, especially due to its unprovoked aggressiveness. So please never show provocative behavior in the presence of this snake.

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Chinese Cobra

Texas Diamond-Back

The Texas Diamond Back is also one of the better known species of snakes. Although it’s hard for us to imagine, the Texas rattlesnake is a common feature on restaurant menus in the American Southwest and Mexico, where it is native. But in order to get them onto your plate, they must first be caught, and we wish you the best of luck with that. They are among the most aggressive snakes in the world, but luckily they will clatter their tails as an advance warning. You should definitely pay attention to this rattling and not get too close to it, because that usually means that the snake is irritated.

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Texas Diamond-Back

Blue Coral Snake

Don’t be fooled by the beautiful colors of the blue viper, as an encounter with this unusual member of the Elapidae family can be deadly. Although a young blue viper can easily be mistaken for a calamaria schlegeli, the calamaria schlegeli is non-venomous, while the blue viper has an extremely fast-acting venom.

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Blue Coral Snake

Australian Black Note

The red-bellied black viper is very common in eastern Australia. The venomous snake stands out with its shimmering, black back and bright orange-red belly and is admittedly also very beautiful to look at. This also makes it easy to spot. So, unlike other snakes on this list, there is no risk of overlooking them. It is native to forests and swamps as well as urban areas. However, it is not considered particularly aggressive and its venom is not deadly, although a bite can cause severe pain. You certainly don’t want that either.

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Australian Black Note

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